Find out more: HPV and males

HPV and Females

Louise, 29
‘During a routine health check my GP suggested I was also long overdue for a Pap smear.’

The whole procedure was pretty painless and I forgot all about it until the following week when my GP asked me to come in for another appointment. Apparently my Pap smear results showed abnormal cells at a stage called CIN 3. She arranged for me to see a gynaecologist a few days after where they examined me further and scheduled me for a day procedure in hospital to remove the abnormal cells from my cervix. Six weeks later at my follow up examination with the gynaecologist I had another Pap smear and the results were all clear. It all happened so fast but I am so grateful to my GP. Now I make sure I have regular Pap smears.

Wendy, 35
‘I was diagnosed with abnormal cells in 1992, approximately 18 months after the birth of my first child.’

I underwent a colposcopy and was advised to have annual Pap smears. In 1995 (after the birth of my second child) I was again diagnosed with CIN 2 which resulted in an extensive cone biopsy. A week later this led to a massive haemorrhage and I was hospitalised for several days and then unable to work for 2 weeks! I was advised that if it happened again a hysterectomy would be necessary. But the good news is that it was all worth it. I went on to complete my family with baby number 3 and ten Pap smears later, every single one has been 100% normal. Yeah!

Sarah, 19
‘Last year I had my first ever Pap smear, I was really dreading it but my GP was great and explained all about it.’

It didn't hurt but I did find it uncomfortable and more embarrassing than anything else. Embarrassing that I didn't even know exactly what a Pap smear was really! I certainly didn't realise it was a cancer test.

Kelly, 22
‘After my second ever Pap smear I got a letter to say that the results were abnormal.’

I freaked out as I hadn't even considered that the results would be anything but normal. After all I have regular periods and have never had any gynae problems before. I had to see the GP again and then he sent me to see a gynaecologist for a colposcopy. There's nothing like having someone look down there with a high microscope. It was all ok in the end, but I did have a few weeks panicking.

NATIONAL HPV
VACCINATION PROGRAM

Find out more about the National Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Program

Find out more


FREE SMS/EMAIL REMINDER

Make sure you complete the full vaccine course. Text the word "HPV" to 1800 858 448

Find out more
bioCSL
63 Poplar Road,
Parkville VIC 3052

What is the main cause of cervical cancer and has been shown to cause some vaginal, vulval and anal cancers and genital warts?

Smoking
Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection
Weakened immune system
Other infections

While factors such as the oral contraceptive pill, smoking, a woman's immune system and the presence of other infections seem to play a part, a woman has to have been infected with certain “high-risk” HPV types before cervical cancer can develop.

In most people HPV is harmless and has no symptoms, but in some people the virus may persist and lead to diseases of the genital area.

In females, HPV has been also been shown to cause some vaginal, vulval and anal cancers and genital warts.

In males, HPV has been shown to cause genital warts and some anal cancers.

Next >

What areas of the body are different HPV types able to infect?

Hands
Feet
Genitals
All of the Above

Human Papillomavirus, or HPV, is a common virus that affects both males and females. There are more than 100 types of the virus. In fact, certain types of HPV cause common warts on the hands and feet

Next >

Up to what proportion of males and females will be infected with at least one type of genital HPV at some time?

5%
15%
30%
80%

Up to 80% of people (males and females) will be infected with at least one type of genital HPV at some time

Next >

There are over 100 types of HPV. Approximately how many infect the genital area?

40
60
80
100

About 40 types of HPV are known as genital HPV as they affect the genital area.

Next >

What percentage of HPV infections are “cleared” by the body’s immune system within the first 36 months?

30%
60%
90%
99%

Up to 90% of HPV infections are "cleared" within 36 months.

Next >

Which two “high-risk” HPV types have been shown to cause approximately 70% of all cervical cancers?

HPV 16 & 33
HPV 16 & 18
HPV 42 & 51
HPV 18 & 42

"High-risk" HPV types 16 & 18 are responsible for ~70% of all cervical cancers.

Next >

Approximately how many new cases of cervical cancer are there a year in Australia?

200
400
600
1000

Each year in Australia approximately 600 new cases of cervical cancer are diagnosed and approximately 130 women die from this disease.

Next >

Globally cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women?

True
False

Globally, cervical cancer is the second most common women's cancer, which is why many countries, including Australia have implemented regular cervical screening (i.e. Pap smears) programs to detect cervical abnormalities.

Next >

Approximately how many cases of anal cancers are there each year in Australia?

25
125
225
325

Anal cancer affects both males and females and, although relatively rare, in 2005 there were 149 cases in males and 176 cases in females.

Next >

Which two types of “low-risk” HPV types have been shown to cause approximately 90% of genital warts?

42 & 31
42 & 52
6 & 11
11 & 45

Up to 90% of genital warts cases are due to infection with “low-risk” HPV types 6 and 11

Next >

It is estimated that what proportion of young sexually active people have genital warts at any one time?

1/50
1/100
1/250
1/500

Genital warts are quite common. Approximately 1% of young sexually active people have them at any one time.

Next >

How are females able to help protect themselves against cervical cancer?

Attend regular Pap smears when recommended to do so
Speak to their doctor about whether they are eligible for vaccination
Use condoms to help reduce the risk of being infected with HPV
All of the above

If used correctly, condoms can help reduce the risk of genital HPV. It is now possible to be vaccinated against cervical cancer. Vaccination does not protect against all HPV types that could cause cervical cancer therefore it is important women continue with regular Pap smears.

Next >

How are males able to help protect themselves against genital warts and some anal cancers?

Speak to their doctor about whether they are eligible for vaccination
Use condoms to help reduce the risk of being infected with HPV
Both of the above

If used correctly, condoms can help reduce the risk of genital HPV. It is now possible to be vaccinated against some types of HPV. It is important you discuss whether you are eligible for vaccination with your doctor first.

Finish >

Thank you for taking the HPV quiz. Please click here to return to the homepage